Friday
April 6, 2018

Project to Improve I-80 Delaware Water Gap interchange begins next week

ALLENTOWN - The Pennsylvania Department of Transportation (PennDOT) announced restrictions are scheduled to commence next week for work on a project to improve the Interstate 80 Exit 310 (PA 611/Delaware Water Gap) interchange in Monroe County.

The project entails replacing the Exit 310 on-ramp bridge to I-80 east in Smithfield Township, and the Exit 310 off-ramp from I-80 west in Delaware Water Gap Borough. Both ramps traverse I-80. Also, the project includes replacing the existing signalized intersection where Broad Street, River Road, Foxtown Hill Road and the Exit 310 ramps meet in Smithfield Township with a roundabout. 

Starting Monday (April 9), weeknight lane restrictions (10:00 PM to 5:00 AM) will occur on I-80 between the Delaware River and Exit 309 (US 209/PA 447). These weeknight restrictions are expected to last through the month of April, however there may be future times when they are implemented.    

Weekday lane restrictions (7:00 AM to 5:00 PM) will also begin Monday on Broad Street between I-80 and Shelding Road, and River Road between I-80 and Foxtown Hill Road. These weekday restrictions will occur throughout the duration of the project 

There will be times later this spring and summer when detours are implemented for Broad Street, River Road, and Foxtown Hill Road during construction of the roundabout. Updates will be provided prior to any detours being implemented.

There will also be times when rolling stoppages occur on I-80 east and west between the hours of 1:00 AM and 5:00 AM, and at least one time when I-80 east is closed and detoured between 1:00 AM and 5:00 AM (I-80 east traffic will detour off at Exit 310 and back on at Exit 310).

All schedules are weather permitting, and updates will be provided to the public in advance of any traffic pattern changes.

HRI, Inc. of State College, PA is the general contractor on the $14.13 million project, which is expected to be complete in November.

The main characteristics of a modern roundabout include: generally circular shape; yield signs at the entrances; geometry that forces slower speeds; and counterclockwise circulation of traffic. Also, unlike traffic signals, roundabouts do not depend on electricity to function, so they are not susceptible to power outages. More information on roundabouts can be found at www.penndot.gov/ProjectAndPrograms/RoadDesignEnvironment/RoadDesign/Pages/Roundabouts.aspx.

An existing roundabout, completed several years ago, is on Route 209 near Marshalls Creek. 


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